THE TRENTON VACANT PROPERTY INVENTORY

 

If you've ever been through Trenton, you know vacant properties are a problem. Every neighborhood has its share of them. One of the worst-affected areas is a block or so from the Statehouse. 

 

Despite general recognition of the problem, good data on the vacant properties in Trenton has been elusive -- and, without good data, solutions have proved elusive too. 

 

In the summer of 2014, the Trenton Neighborhood Restoration Campaign, under the leadership of local non-profit Isles, Inc., worked with the City of Trenton, the Rutgers Center for Urban Environmental Sustainability (CUES), and community groups throughout the city to identify all the vacant properties in town. Armed with a handheld app, teams of interns and volunteers went to every block in the city and entered observations about the status and condition of every tax lot. In August 2019, we resurveyed the city again to track vacant property trends over five years. Those results have updated the map and can be exported in the 'Survey Data and Downloads' Section.

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This interactive site is a resource for anyone who cares about New Jersey's capital city. Use it to check out what's happening in your neighborhood, suggest solutions, and flag a property as vacant (or not). 

© 2020 by the Trenton Neighborhood Restoration Campaign.

In sight of the Statehouse

A severely dilapidated building on Spring Street.